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Managed Metadata – No Pain, No Gain

Posted by Andy Campbell on Thu, Jun 28, 2012 @ 13:06 PM

Managed Metadata – No Pain, No Gain

We are starting a managed metadata project for a key government agency (the whole Agency).  The various component parts of the Agency, which provides a very important public service, all have their own lists of terms and often use different words to describe the same thing.  We are starting by identifying individuals in various offices to develop a metadata system than can work for the whole organization.  We are asking them to bring their term lists to the project and we expect some real fights when we start talking about how these lists will be merged and organized.  Which brings me to the point of this blog entry – if you don’t have major fights when trying to develop managed metadata, your project is in trouble.  It means that your clients don’t care about metadata, don’t have any intention of participating in a meaningful way, or don’t think the effort will yield anything useful.  It is by going through the messy process of creating a common metadata framework that the organization will understand it and adopt it.

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Topics: sharepoint best practices, collaborative technology, office collaboration, moss sharepoint, sharepoint moss, sharepoint deployment, moss, sharepoint blog, sharepoint installation, Metadata, user adoption strategy

Why is SharePoint a “dirty word” in the Federal Government?

Posted by Andy Campbell on Fri, Jun 22, 2012 @ 13:06 PM

Why is SharePoint a “dirty word” in the Federal Government?

Someone told me the other day that SharePoint was a “dirty word” in the Federal Government.  She said it is too hard to use and that it complicates things more than helps them.  While there are exceptions, it is arguable that there are too many cases where SharePoint is badly implemented and underused (or ignored) by end users.  I also had someone recently say that their Federal Government SharePoint program was “advanced” because it had large numbers of customized sites (even though the user numbers are low).  So what’s the deal?

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Topics: sharepoint best practices, collaborative technology, sharepoint deployment, sharepoint installation, user adoption strategy, knowledge management best practices, knowledge management strategy

SharePoint Migration – Avoiding the Dump Truck Method

Posted by Andy Campbell on Tue, Jun 19, 2012 @ 15:06 PM

SharePoint Migration – Avoiding the Dump Truck Method

If you have an implemented SharePoint program you will, inevitably, have to migrate your platform and all your data to a more updated version of SharePoint.  Unfortunately many program managers, faced with time and resources challenges, use what AKG calls the “dump truck migration method”:  back the truck up, load it up with all current data and sites and dump it into the new environment.  The truck load includes dead sites, outdated user directories, inefficient site architecture, poor taxonomies, and costly custom code.  Any quality assurance or “user” acceptance testing is done by a handful of IT staff who all have other duties, and can’t possibly understand the business needs for each and every site.

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Topics: sharepoint best practices, sharepoint deployment, user adoption strategy, knowledge management implementation, migration

Enterprise Information Sharing using SharePoint

Posted by Andy Campbell on Thu, Jun 14, 2012 @ 15:06 PM

Enterprise Information Sharing using SharePoint

The vast majority of enterprise “knowledge management” (KM) or “information sharing” frameworks are built at great expense by IT teams, launched with fanfare, and then immediately start to fall apart.  The problem is that they are too rigid, too tightly controlled, and too dependent on a dedicated team for filtering and maintenance.  All too often this team knows little about the day-to-day realities of the organizations mission, and they certainly aren’t able to keep up with fast-moving change.

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Topics: User Adoption, knowledge management best practices